Gettysburg Address

The Gettysburg Address is a speech by President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best known in American history. It was delivered by Lincoln during the Civil War on the afternoon of this day in 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania four and a half months after the Union armies defeated those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg.

Abraham Lincoln’s carefully crafted address, secondary to other presentations that day, was one of the greatest and most influential statements of national purpose. In just over two minutes, Lincoln reiterated the principles of human equality espoused by the Declaration of Independence and proclaimed the Civil War as a struggle for the preservation of the Union sundered by the secession crisis, with “a new birth of freedom,” that would bring true equality to all of its citizens. Lincoln also redefined the Civil War as a struggle not just for the Union, but also for the principle of human equality.

Beginning with the now-iconic phrase “Four score and seven years ago”—referring to the Declaration of Independence in 1776—Lincoln examined the founding principles of the United States as stated in the Declaration of Independence. In the context of the Civil War, Lincoln also memorialized the sacrifices of those who gave their lives at Gettysburg and extolled virtues for the listeners (and the nation) to ensure the survival of America’s representative democracy: that “government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.” (from Wikipedia)

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July 4th Celebration

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This national day is commonly known as the Fourth of July (or July Fourth or Independence Day). It commemorates the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, which was responsible for its independence from Great Britain. Independence Day is a huge celebration all over the country, including fireworks, concerts, parades, baseball games, barbecues, carnivals, fairs, picnics, political speeches, and various other public and private events.
4th of July celebrates the history, government, and traditions of the United States and is an opportunity for a reunion of family and friends as schools are closed, and the day is a holiday for almost everyone. All non-essential federal institutions are closed on Independence Day, too, as in 1938 the US Congress changed the day to be a paid federal holiday. The celebrations are also marked by patriotic displays: both decorations and clothing are colored white, red, and blue – like the colors of the American flag.
On July 2nd, 1776 the Continental Congress voted in favor of independence. On July 4th its 56 delegates finally adopted the Declaration of Independence and thirteen colonies (Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Maryland, Massachusetts Bay, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, South Carolina, and Virginia) became the United States of America. (from www.cute-calendar.com)