Daylight Savings Time Starts


Most of the US, Canada and Mexico’s northern border cities started Daylight Saving Time (DST) at 2 A.M. local time today. The clock “spring forward” (by shifting the clock forward) an hour, so that evenings have more daylight and mornings have less. Most of Europe will start DST on the last Sunday in March. With most of North America shifting at 02:00 local time, its zones do not shift at the same time, but increase through each time zone: EST, CST, MST, PST. Typically, clocks are adjusted forward one hour near the start of spring and are adjusted backward in autumn. The modern idea of daylight saving was first implemented during the First World War. Many countries have used it at various times since then.

DST clock shifts present other challenges. They complicate timekeeping and can disrupt meetings, travel, billing, recordkeeping, medical devices, heavy equipment, and sleep patterns. Software can often adjust computer clocks automatically, but this can be limited and error-prone, particularly when Daylight Saving Time protocols are changed. (from: Wikipedia and




Bill of Rights

The Bill of Rights was enacted, amending the U. S. Constitution tomorrow, December 15th, in 1791. It is a list of the most important rights of the citizens, the purpose of which is to protect those rights against infringement from public officials and private citizens. (Below is a brief description of each article in the Bill of Rights)


  1. Prohibits Congress from making any law  respecting an establishment of religion, impeding free exercise of religion, infringing on freedom of  speech and of the press, interfering with the right to peaceable assembly or prohibiting the petitioning for a governmental redress of grievances;
  2. Protects the right to keep and bear arms;
  3. Places restrictions on the “quartering” of soldiers in private homes without owner’s consent; prohibited during peacetime;
  4. Prohibits unreasonable searches and seizures, and sets out requirements for search warrants based on probable cause;
  5. Sets out rules for indictment by grand jury and eminent domain, protects the right to due process, and prohibits self-incrimination and double jeopardy;
  6. Protects the right to a fair and speedy public trial by jury, including rights to be notified of the accusations, to confront the accuser, to obtain witnesses and to retain counsel;
  7. Provides for the right to trial by jury in certain civil cases;
  8. Prohibits excessive fines and excessive bail, as well as cruel and unusual punishment;
  9. Protects rights not enumerated in the Constitution;
  10.  Reinforces the principle of federalism by stating that the federal government possesses only those powers delegated to it by the states or the people through the Constitution.  (from Wikipedia)